Bitcoin Dice
Category:

Battleborn – Everything you need to know about Bitcoin Dice

 

 

Don’t be so quick to call it a MOBA. At first glance, Battleborn might look like it fits the ever-popular MOBA formula, with its colorful cast of heroes, AI-controlled minions trotting towards an opposing base, and 5v5-focused multiplayer modes. But developer Gearbox Software would rather you refer to Battleborn as a ‘hero shooter’, because there’s far more going on here than the three-lane action you’re used to. For starters, Battleborn will cost full price ($60 / £44) when it debuts for PS4, Xbox One, and PC on May 3, 2016, so there’s no need to fear the usual trappings of a free-to-play model. And for everyone who’s played and loved the Borderlands series, the story campaign in Battleborn (playable in singleplayer or co-op, no less) looks like it’ll be right up your alley. If you’re wondering what exactly Battleborn’s bombastic FPS action is all about, here’s everything you need to know.

 

The heroes

As with fighting games and other hero-centric shooters like Overwatch, the roster of characters in Battleborn could very well make or break your interest in the game. Battleborn’s roster will include 25 heroes at launch, hailing from five sci-fi factions that blend nature, magic, and tech: the United Peacekeeping Republics, Eldrid, Last Light Consortium (LLC), Rogues, and Jennerit Imperium. These titular Battleborn have been driven from their homes, and now war over Solus – the last remaining star in the universe – to call it their own.

 

With heroes come abilities, and each Battleborn has six unique traits (counting passives) that dictate their playstyle. Heroes are classified under three easily understood roles – attacker, defender, or support – but vary wildly in terms of complexity, from simple point-and-shoot gunners like Oscar Mike to tricky melee-attacking healers such as Ambra. You won’t have access to all the heroes right from the get-go, but additional characters are easily unlocked as your overall profile levels up – and it won’t take ages to access the entire cast through play alone, unlike most MOBAs. Because you’ve already paid for a full-price game, you also won’t have to pay an additional cent to earn bonuses like new taunt animations or alternate color palettes for your favorite heroes.

 

The first-person perspective

While thematically similar games like Smite and Paragon opt for a third-person viewpoint instead of the typical top-down perspective, Battleborn is the first game built to deliver hero battles in first-person. To succeed on this atypical battlefield, you’ll need to do everything you’d normally do in a multiplayer shooter: check your corners, watch out for snipers, and hide behind cover whenever necessary. At first, it can be a lot to take in, especially with Battleborn’s incredibly colorful, vibrant aesthetic (and the fact that certain abilities will momentarily zoom you out to a third-person view). But once you’ve learned your way around a map, mastered your own move kit, and know which flashy abilities to avoid, you’ll be golden.

 

Speaking of abilities, Battleborn’s controls work beautifully on …

Posted On :
Bitcoin Dice
Category:

The very best games like Bitcoin Dice

 

 

The hits just keep on coming, as February dumped another heap of must-play games onto your frighteningly large backlog (better get on that, by the way – 2016 is only just beginning). Besides our Game of the Month picks, you could spend hours perfecting your fighting style in Street Fighter 5, mourning the loss of your best soldiers in XCOM 2 and Fire Emblem Fates, or delighting in the charms of Unravel and Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2. It just goes to show that a month doesn’t need to be packed with AAA games to do a number on both your wallet and free time.

 

Every month, we pick two games from our multitude of reviews that stand above the rest, getting our full recommendation no matter what type of gamer you are. If you’re already looking forward to all the highly anticipated new games of 2016, playing these excellent titles should tide you over until then.

 

Firewatch seems like a tranquil game at first. You control Henry as he heads into the Wyoming wilderness to make sure no one burns the place down over the summer. He’s had a lot of life stuff going on lately, and this seems to be a good way to empty his mind and just focus on one day at a time for a bit. He spends his days staring out of a watchtower while Delilah, his supervisor and only form of human contact, exists only as a voice that pipes out of his walkie-talkie. Life finally seems like it’s going to be nice and boring for once – but a disquiet simmers within the Wyoming forests like tinders in drybrush, and uncovering the mystery hidden in the woods provides Firewatch’s biggest draw.

 

That palpable sense of tension is expertly delivered by its two leads. They talk, they banter, they question and doubt, and their friendship builds and grows realistically, even as it strains under the weight of their job and the bizarre events that unfold around them. The choices you make aren’t life-altering in the typical sense – no branching paths or morality gates here – but they do alter the life of Henry, slowly filling in the cracks of his personality with details of your choosing. Firewatch, then, is a gripping tale about how we deal with the consequences of our actions that’s equal parts suspenseful and grounded, and it’ll keep you glued to your screen from its startling intro right up to its somber finale.

 

You’re not really in any danger in Layers of Fear, the tale of a painter desperately trying to create the perfect portrait, but that doesn’t make it any less creepy. Favoring atmosphere over gore, Layers of Fear is still quite unsettling despite the fact that death at the hands of the mansion’s ghost may actually be a good option to pursue. The layers of the title don’t just refer to the paint being applied to the canvas, but also …

Posted On :